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This clergy of St. Andrew's




ISAAC PETER LABAGH

CHARLES H. CANFIELD

CHARLES B. STOUT

JOHN PORTMESS

WILLIAM N. COLEGROVE
Aug. 25, 1872-October 1874
Deacon
The Rev. Mr. Colegrove was a protégé of St. Andrew’s founding priest, the Rev. Isaac P. Labagh. Born April 18, 1838, in Chemung County, N.Y., he had arrived in Lucas County as early as 1861 since he married Susan McCann here on the 5th of October during that year. He also was a Civil War veteran, enlisting in Lucas County on 20 February 1864 in Co. H, 1st Iowa Cavalry, and serving until honorably discharged on 26 September 1865 at Elmira, New York.
 
When Labagh met Colegrove, he was laboring as a Baptist preacher, probably in or near Russell while Labagh was organizing St. Michael’s Episcopal Church there during 1867-68.

After a year of “education” at the hands of the Rev. Mr. Labagh, Colegrove was confirmed an Episcopalian on April 17, 1869, and ordained a deacon the next day by Bishop Perry at Christ Church in Burlington. A few days later, on April 27, he assisted the Rev. Mr. Labagh when Bishop Perry preached his first sermon in the newly-built St. Andrew’s Church in Chariton.

From June 1, 1869, and for some time thereafter, Colegrove was assigned as missionary in the southern half of the Diocese of Iowa’s Western Convocation District, serving scattered parishioners in Russell, Osceola, Creston, Garden Grove, Corydon and Centerville. He lived during part of that time at least in the house Labagh had built in Russell, the first two-story house in that community. After Labagh’s death during December 1869, he continued those duties while three other priests were named in quick succession as missionaries in charge at St. Andrew’s.

Colegrove was named missionary in charge at St. Andrew’s as of Aug. 25, 1872, and continued to fulfill that obligation, and others, until October of 1874.

Although he continued to be a resident of Lucas County into the late 1870s, Colegrove’s license as a deacon was withdrawn and he was deposed from the ministry on June 22, 1881, because he had “abandoned the communion of the (Episcopal) church.”
 
Colegrove had returned to his native territory in New York prior to 1880, however, and was living with his family in Elmira and working as an upholsterer during that year. He continued to live in Elmira until his death in 1915.

ROBERT TREWARTHA
June 15, 1875-June 1876
Deacon
 

The Rev. Robert Trewartha (sometimes misspelled "Trewatha") was born during September of 1830 in England according to the 1900 census of Rock County, Wisconsin, where he was living during that year, and emigrated to the United States in 1854. Ordainted a deacon during December of 1858, he was canonically a resident of Indiana from 1858-1863, when he transferred to the Diocese of Illinois. After serving several parishes there, he transferred to the Diocese of Iowa during 1870 and served St. Mark's Parish, Anamosa, among others before coming to Chariton.

Whether or not his troubles began in Chariton or elsewhere would be difficult if not impossible to determine, but he was deposed from the ministry by Bishop Lee during 1876, apparently while serving in Chariton, and as late as 1885, when he petitioned to be reinstated, the Diocese of Iowa declined. The nature of his offense isn't clear, but in at least one instance he is said to have "renounced" his vocation. The Rev. Mr. Trewartha removed to Rock County, Wisconsin, where his final years were spent. He later was licensed as a lay reader by the Diocese of Wisconsin and continued to style himself a clergyman until his death which occurred at Milton in 1912. He was buried in the Milton Cemetery. He did not marry and so far as is known left no immediate survivors.

JOSEPH ALEXANDER RUSSELL
15 June 1876-15 December 1879
April 1886-10 April 1887
As rector emeritus, 14 April 1897-death on 6 April 1911

As much educator as priest, the Rev. Joseph Alexander Russell was first called to serve as rector of St. Andrew's in 1876 and was installed on June 15 of that year. He resigned on 15 December 1879 after three and a half years of service. The Rev. Mr. Russell was recalled during April of 1886 and after serving a year, resigned on April 10, 1887. The only priest to settle permanently in Chariton, he was named rector emeritus on 14 April 1897 and held that position until his death on 6 April 1911 at age 89.

Russell was born 25 November 1822 in Philadelphia, son of James Russell, a gun-maker who had brought his family to the United States from Staffordshire, England, a few years before. Educated at the Wesleyan Academy in Wilbraham, Massachusetts, he taught for a few years before enrolling at the Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria. Following his ordination at Christ Church, Alexandria, he served a parish in King George County, Virginia, before joining work on the frontier launched by the Rt. Rev. Jackson Kemper, at that time missionary bishop of Minnesota. He eventually became the first rector of the Episcopal Church of the Ascension in Stillwater. He also served as superintendent of public schools in Stillwater during at least part of his tenure there.

After leaving Minnesota, Russell served St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, but his first wife, Sarah E. (Parker) Russell, died in 1862 while he was incumbent there, leaving him with three sons --- Howard, Calvin and Lee, and this may have been a factor in his decision to shift his focus to education. While serving as principal of a private academy in Glens Falls, New York, he married as his second wife Jennie Cushing. They had two children, Charles, who died at age 22, and Florence, who died in infancy, both of whom are buried in the Chariton Cemetery.

In June of 1876, Russell brought his family to Chariton and served St. Andrew's until December of 1879 when he accepted a call to St. Thomas Church in Falls City, Nebraska. In April of 1886, upon returning to live in Chariton, Russell was recalled as rector of St. Andrew's and served a year. During his years in Chariton, he also served much of the time as superintendent of the public schools.

In April of 1897, Russell was named rector emeritus of St. Andrew's and continued to participate in the life of the parish to the extent his health permitted until the 6th of April 1911, when he died at the age of 89. He was buried in the Chariton Cemetery beside his children Charles and Florence. Jennie Russell died a few years later on February 13, 1919, in Lincoln, Nebraska, and her remains were returned to Chariton for burial.


JOHN QUICK ARCHDEACON
Three months in the spring of 1880


An episcopal priest with the surname Archdeacon has caused some confusion over the years in various parishes. John was an Archdeacon, but not an archdeacon. He was a New Jersey native ordained deacon on 27 May 1877 at the Church of the Transfiguration in New York City and as priest on 25 January 1878 in the Diocese of Colorado who bounced around the West and Midwest for a few years before returning to the East where most of his career was spent. The Rev. Mr. Archdeacon also served St. Andrew's Church, Denver, and Christ Church, Dubuque, during this same period so it's not clear if he was a called priest or just filling in for various parishes as he made his way back to the east coast. His 20-year tenure 1880-1900 as rector of St. James Episcopal Church in the hamlet of St. James, Long Island, was perhaps his longest.


JAMES L. STRONG

PETER CLARK WOLCOTT

BRADFORD R. KIRKBRIDE

GEORGE FREDERIC DEGAN

JOSEPH ALEXANDER RUSSELL

F. DUNCAN JANDON

A.C. STILSON, J.A. RUSSELL, DR. HOTY, F.K. HOWARD

WILLIAM VESEY WHITTEN

FRANK W. HENRY

WEBSTER HAKES

GEORGE CHAMBERS

ARCHIBALD W. SIDDERS

WILLIAM DUNLAP MORROW

WILLIAM N. WYCOFF

CHESTER A TAYLOR

WILLIAM HENRY HAUPT

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